LIVING HISTORY

Craft Description Comment
Price

Stone Age Living History - including flintknapping demo

Service code: 100

Living history presentation, including replica Stone Age dwelling, artwork and artefacts; plus primitive techniques to demonstrate making a range of flint hand tools from prehistory.

Content varied to suit all ages from 8 through to adult.

Read more how this can work for your event

Full period costume

Outdoor event or well ventilated room

Typically from £300 per day (plus expenses)

Stone Age Living History Activities - No flintknapping

Service code: 110

Living history presentation (in costume), including replica Stone Age dwelling, artwork and artefacts. This could include some fun prehistoric activities, such as painting, using natural materials, simple jewellery.

Content varied to suit all ages from 8 through to adult.

Read more how this can work for your event

Full period costume

Indoor or Outdoor event

Typically from £275 per day (plus expenses)

Flintknapping lecture & demonstration

Service code: 120

Demonstration and lecture on techniques for making a range of flint tools from different cultures in prehistory.

Content varied to suit all ages from 8 through to adult.

Read more how this can work for your event

Not in costume

Outdoor event or well ventilated room

Typically from £275 per day (plus expenses)

Ancient Shaman presentation

Service code: 140

Shaman head-dress & costume, jewellery, burial goods, venus figurines, ritual demonstration (deerskin drum) and talk

Read more how this can work for your event

Full period costume

Indoor or Outdoor event

Typically from £275 per day (plus expenses)

Schools ~ Stone Age Workshop

Service code: 160

Living history especially suited for schools, including flintknapping demo, tools, artefacts/replica's and talks on the transition from Palaeolithic → Mesolithic → Neolithic

Content varied to suit Key Stage 2 & 3

Read more how this can work for your event

Full period costume

Indoor or Outdoor event

Price on Application

Schools ~ Prehistoric Workshop

Service code: 170

Living history especially suited for schools, including flintknapping demo, tools, artefacts/replica's and talks on the transition from Stone Age → Bronze Age → Iron Age

Content varied to suit Key Stage 2 & 3

Read more how this can work for your event

Full period costume

Indoor or Outdoor event

Price on Application

 

Bronze & copper casting demo

Service code: 180

 

Demonstation of metal working techniques from the Bronze Age used to make a variety of tools and artefacts. The demonstration will include the preparation of moulds and authentic equipment before casting metal to produce a replica.

Content varied to suit all ages from 8 through to adult.

Full period costume on request

Outdoor event

Hard or Soft ground

*Promotional price*

£200 per day (plus expenses)

 

Copper smelting demonstration

Service code: 190

 

Demonstation of metal extraction processes using authetnic Bronze Age equipment and methods. Copper ore will be prepared before being smelted and poured out as molten copper.

Content varied to suit all ages from 8 through to adult.

Full period costume on request

Outdoor event

Hard or Soft ground

*Promotional price*

£200 per day (plus expenses)

Late Roman Army presentation

Service code: 190

3rd - 5th Century British-Romano army life. Combat techniques and stories. Examples of weapons, armour and tools displayed.

Content varied to suit all ages from 8 through to adult.

Read more how this can work for your event

Can be in full period costume if requested
Typically from £275 per day (plus expenses)
         

WORKSHOPS

Craft Description Comment
Price

Flintknapping

Service code: 210

Learn ancient (basic or advanced) techniques, using hard and soft hammers to make a range of flint hand tools from pre-history. Participants will be able to take home any stone tools they make.

Individual tuition - Maximum group of 8-10 and suitable for ages from 14 through to adult (safety equipment provided).

Read more how this can work for your event

Outdoor event or well ventilated room

Contact Ancientcraft for details of group bookings or individuals

Prehistoric Arrow

Service code: 220

Make a complete prehistoric arrow from scratch:

  • Knap the arrowhead from flint
  • Select a hazel shaft and straighten over an open fire
  • Make tree pitch glue
  • Fix the arrowhead to the shaft
  • Fletch the full Goose feathers to the shaft

Individual tuition - Maximum group of 4-6 and suitable for ages from 14 through to adult (safety equipment provided).

Outdoor event

Contact Ancientcraft for details of group bookings or individuals

Atlatl

Service code: 230

Assemble / decorate your own Atlatl and fletch your own dart. Then see how far can you launch the 1.5m dart at animal targets using the Atlatl (world record is around 280m)

Individual tuition - Maximum group of 8-10 and suitable for ages from 10 through to adult (safety equipment provided).

Outdoor event (Large area)
Contact Ancientcraft for details of group bookings or individuals

Bronze & copper casting workshops

Service code: 240

Following a safety briefing, workshop attendees will prepare their own mould before working the bellows on the furnace to melt the copper or bronze. They will then cast the liquid melt into the prepared moulds to produce a replica artefact to take home at the end of the day.

Guidance will be on-hand at all times.

Individual tuition - Maximum group of 6 and suitable for ages from 16 through to adult (safety equipment provided).

Outdoor Event

(Hard or Soft ground)

Contact Ancientcraft for details of group bookings or individuals

Copper smelting workshops

Service code: 250

Following a safety briefing, workshop attendees will prepare crucibles, copper ore and charcoal before working the bellows to produce a lump of pure copper to take home at the end of the day.

Guidance will be on-hand at all times.

Individual tuition - Maximum group of 6 and suitable for ages from 16 through to adult (safety equipment provided).

Outdoor Event

(Hard or Soft ground)

Contact Ancientcraft for details of group bookings or individuals
         

FILMING & PROP HIRE

Craft Description
Price

Flintknapping / Living History Filming

Service code: 300

Ancientcraft has worked with a number of media and public organisations (e.g. BBC, English Heritage, Time Team, Channel, ITV, Oxford Scientific Films, National Geographic, Wall to Wall)

For prehistoric re-enactment, advice on flintknapping or layout of prehistoric film sets, please contact Ancient Craft for details

Typically from £300 per day (plus expenses)

Prop Hire

Service code: 400

Most items on this website can be hired for filming or demonstration purposes per day or per week.

Commissions accepted for any items not shown

Contact Ancientcraft for details
         

ITEMS FOR SALE

Item
Description
Image (example only)

Lower Palaeolithic Handaxe (replica)

£20.00

(excludes P&P)

>>see more about handaxes

Handaxes are the most iconic artefact representing the Palaeolithic and can be found all over the world. They were made particularly famous in Britain after the discovery of the middle Pleistocene butchery sites such as Swanscombe (Kent) and at Boxgrove (West Sussex) which date to around 500,000 BP. A recently found handaxe from Happisburgh (Norfolk) dated as far back as 700,000 BP!

The handaxe represents the earliest complex tool manufacture in the world as it is a step above the earlier core and flake culture of the Olduwan. A process of bifacial knapping in a progression of stages would determine the size and thickness of the handaxe.

The form of a handaxes can vary from pointed, ovate or cleaver which may show changes in ‘development’ or emergence of different hominin groups who moved across the landscape following animal herds.

Neolithic Flint Axehead (replica)

£20.00

(excludes P&P)

>>see more about axeheads

The Neolithic axe would have been hafted in a wooden handle. Its uses could have included tree clearance for agriculture, wood working and flint mining.

Vast areas of land were cleared over many generations. It is likely that very well made axes were passed down through generations and represented family groups.

The image of an axe head in the Neolithic would have been one of power and influence which is a constant theme throughout prehistory. Axes were bi-facially worked to give a strong shape and long lasting cutting edge.

 

Variations:

  • Fully polished axehead - £200
  • Partially polished (at the axe blade and spine) - £100
  • Axehead & Handle - £50

Bout Coupé handaxe (replica)

 

£20.00

(excludes P&P)

A distinctive Neanderthal style of handaxe created towards the end of the Middle Palaeolithic. Thought to be a “reinvention of the handaxe” after it had disappeared from use. These handaxes were finely flaked and make superb butchery and skinning tools.


The best handaxes of this style are generally found in the UK despite having a french name. An especially well known example was found during excavation at Castle Land, Bournmouth. These handaxes diappeared again with their Neanderthal creators around 40,000 years ago.

Mesolithic tranchet axe head (replica)

£20.00

(excludes P&P)

The tranchet axe is really the first type of tree felling or woodworking axe seen in Britain around 10,000 years ago. These are similar to Neolithic flaked axes besides the single flake removal from the blade the “tranchet” (french for slice).

The tranchet makes the axe very sharp at the blade but would need another removal to make it sharp again. Such axes would have been used to creating artificial clearings for hunting. Bows and canoes have been found dating to the Mesolithic, it is likely this type of axe was used in part to make them.

Variation:

  • Tranchet axe head and handle - £50

Neolithic Wisted axe head (replica)

£25.00

(excludes P&P)

These axes appear at the end of the Neolithic, not especially common in comparison to the standard axes of the Neolithic and were not fully polished. It is unliekly these were tree felling axes due to their thin profile, however it is very liekly they were carpentry axes or adze blades. They take a little longer to flake than the standard neolithic axe because they are thinner.

One of the most famous comes from the York hoard, a collection of neolithic tools including a axe head that may have been a flintknappers stock.

Variation:

  • Waisted axe head and handle - £55

Upper Palaeolithic Solutrean spear head (replica)

 

£35.00

(excludes P&P)

The Solutrean period dates between 22,000 and 17,000 BP. As with most of the Upper palaeolithic periods it is characteristised by the types of flint tools found. The most well-known from the solutrean are the finely flaked spear points that have been found across central France. They are generally considered a high point in flintknapping ability during the earlier half of prehistory in Europe.


Making such a spear head is no easy task and requires much experience and knapping skill. As with all tools the first stage is to start with a whole nodule. Next, the nodule is flaked into a blank or roughout. The blank is then re-flaked to reduce the thickness of the blank. The next stage is to start sharping the thinned blank while contnuing to reduce the overall thickness. Finally the spear point is pressure flaked to straighten and sharpen the edge.

Variation:

  • Fully hafted as a whole spear with sinew binding and authentic resin glue - £70

Neolithic Axe Heads (replica roughouts, fully flaked and polished) of exotic material

Please Enquire

Polished axe heads made of volcanic stone have been found across the UK, often hundreds of miles from the rock source.

Famous examples include Great Langdale Tuff and Graig Lywd microdiorite.

These axes were highly prized as stunning functional tools that often outstriped flint axes for longevity.

Polished Axe Head and polishing stone (replica)

Please Enquire

 

A Neolithic axe head is not complete without a polishing stone. Used to grind off the flaking scars, these stones would be used for hundreds of hours to slowly smooth the surface of a stone axe.

The stone istelf must be an abrasive rock so sandstone is perfect. Ancient examples can be seen at sites such as Avebury, West Kennet long barrow and Fyfield Down (Wiltshire).

The quartz grains of the polishing stone are slightly harder than the axe stone meaning it will grind into its surface and create the polished effect.

Note: this is a very heavy item that will need to be collected or delivered

3 x Large Upper Palaeolithic Blades (replica)

£10.00

(excludes P&P)

Length 10cm

These extra large blades were produced in the upper palaeolithic for knife blades and spear points. Generally thicker and longer than their latter Mesolithic counterparts, these blades require great skills and preparation to produce.

These blades can be produced using laminar or levallois core techniques

5 x Mesolithic Blades (replica)

£10.00

(excludes P&P)

Length 6-10cm

 

Flint blades were vital in the Meolithic for cutting tools, projectiles, harpoons and more. Any site with evidence of Mesolithic activity will have blades or blade based tools on. Each blade is a single strike removal from a carefully prepared blade core.

The angle and shape of the platform is vital for detaching good blades. The blades themselves have to be the correct angle and curve to ensure they don’t terminate prematurely. Once detached with a soft hammer, the edges are razor sharp.

3 x Microliths (replica)

£10.00

(excludes P&P)

Microliths are well-known Mesolithic tool types that are thought to have been used as projectile and harpoon barbs. Derived from a blade, these tiny implements can range in size from a few cm to a few mm in size!


A set can be made hafted into a spear / harpoon / arrow, please contact me for details.

Mesolithic blade core assemblage (replica)

£15.00

(excludes P&P)

>>see more about Blade Cores

Removing flakes from a core is one of the oldest methods of stone tool production. The technique of removing long, thin flakes known as “blades” is far more refined with a much clearer aim to manufacture blades of a certain form. This practice became very common in the Mesolithic (10,000-7500BP).

Blades are incredibly versatile and were used on the end of arrow shafts, knife and sickle handles, harpoons, drawing tools, scrapers, burins and awls to name but a few!


Because many blades can be removed from a single core, it is one of the most efficient and economical tool production methods. A core can be carried around making it a useful source of fresh “pocket tools”. This fitted in very well into nomadic groups who did not need to be near a flint outcrop.

Chisel arrowhead (replica)

£12.00

(excludes P&P)


Chisel arrow (full arrow replica)

£32.00

(excludes P&P)

A type of arrowhead from the Middle Neolithic (approx. 3400-2600 BC). Commonly found in southern Britain, the chisel arrowhead is a fairly unusual style of projectile point that has been attributed to bird hunting. Clearly such arrowheads could cause much damage, more so than the earlier ‘Leaf arrowhead’.


The full arrow has a hazel shaft that has been de-barked with a flint flake and straighten over a fire. Once a notch is cut at both ends (one for the arrowhead and one for the bow string) the arrowhead is glued and bound in place. The binding used is sinew, and the glue is a mixture of pine resin, beeswax and charcoal powder. Finally the goose feather flights are bound on near the nock.

Note: These replica prehistoric arrows can be used for one-off use, however they are NOT constructed for regular use and will not last under those conditions.

See me using them on the BBC's The Great British Countryside >>

 

Leaf arrowhead (replica)

£12.00

(excludes P&P)


Leaf arrow (full arrow replica)

£32.00

(excludes P&P)

Produced between approx. 4000-3400 BC the leaf arrowhead is one of the most commonly found arrowhead from the Neolithic period. Very simple in design but often very beautifully flaked these arrowheads were used for hunting animals and skirmishes with rival settlements.


The full arrow has a hazel shaft that has been de-barked with a flint flake and straighten over a fire. Once a notch is cut at both ends (one for the arrowhead and one for the bow string) the arrowhead is glued and bound in place. The binding used is sinew, and the glue is a mixture of pine resin, beeswax and charcoal powder. Finally the goose feather flights are bound on near the nock.

Note: These replica prehistoric arrows can be used for one-off use, however they are NOT constructed for regular use and will not last under those conditions.

See me using them on the BBC's The Great British Countryside >>

Oblique arrowhead (replica)

£12.00

(excludes P&P)


Oblique arrowhead (full arrow replica)

£32.00

(excludes P&P)

A short lived style of arrowhead before the appearance of the barbed & tanged arrowhead. This type of arrowhead is fairly well-known due to its circulation around the time of Stonehnge’s completion and the occupation of the nearby habitation site of Durrington Walls.

These arrowheads show a clear leap in projectile technology with a clear barb on one side of the arrowhead.

Note: These replica prehistoric arrows can be used for one-off use, however they are NOT constructed for regular use and will not last under those conditions.

See me using them on the BBC's The Great British Countryside >>

 

Barbed & Tanged arrowhead (replica)

£15.00

(excludes P&P)


Barbed & Tanged arrow (full arrow replica)

£35.00

(excludes P&P)

The final clear style of flint arrowhead in the British Isles, the barbed and tanged arrowhead is certainly the most well known in archaeology. Commonly associated with famous monuments such as Stonehenge, these arrowheads were status symbols as well as effective hunting tools. Beaker period (late Neolithic – early Bronze Age) burials often contain some of these arrowheads.


The full arrow has a hazel shaft that has been de-barked with a flint flake and straighten over a fire. Once a notch is cut at both ends (one for the arrowhead and one for the bow string) the arrowhead is glued and bound in place. The binding used is sinew, and the glue is a mixture of pine resin, beeswax and charcoal powder. Finally the goose feather flights are bound on near the nock.

Note: These replica prehistoric arrows can be used for one-off use, however they are NOT constructed for regular use and will not last under those conditions.

See me using them on the BBC's The Great British Countryside >>

Scraper (replica)

£5.00

(excludes P&P)

One of the most common types of flint tool found, scrapers were made and used from the lower Palaeolithic up until the Bronze Age. They certainly stood the test of time during the Stone Age.

These tools are idealy for working hides but are also useful for a variety of a other tasks. It was been concluded some may have been hafted for better leverage. They are generally found on almost all types of early prehistoric site, no assemblage is complete without one!

Hafted flint sickle (replica)

£40.00

(excludes P&P)

With the rise of agriculture in Neolithic Britain around 6000 years ago, people needed a way of easily harvesting crops. The sickle was created to cut handfuls of crop stalks at a time. The flint blade is carefully flaked into a curved shape with the help of an antler soft hammer.

An appropreiately shaped piece of wood is then chosen and cut for the sickle handle. A groove is then cut out of the wood for the blade. Following this, the flint blade is glued in place with resin glue.

Variation:

  • Unhafted flint sickle blade - £20

 

Neolithic Discoidal knife (unpolished replica)

£10.00

(excludes P&P)

 

Highly prized personal pocessions of the Neolithic, these knives have been likened to Inuit Ulu knives. With one half polished and one half left blank they can be very effective multi-purpose tools.

An example from a swiss lakesite showed some probably had a handle similar to the one in the photo (left).

These tools were commonly made on good quality flint from source sites such as Grimes Graves. This meant the knives could be finely flaked into discoids or sub-squares.

Variations:

  • Neolithic Discoidal knife (polished) - £50
  • Resin glued handle - £20

 

Early Bronze Age plano-convex knife (replica)

£10.00

(excludes P&P)

Very typical on early Bronze Age sites, these start life as a single flake before typically being flaked on one side only or “unifacial”. These tools have been likened to pocket knives due to their small, conveinient size.

Their frequnency at EBA sites also suggets most people would have had access and carried one of these tools.

Palaeolithic toolkit (replica)

£80.00

(excludes P&P)

 

Ten items including flint handaxe, flint blades, scrappers, bone needle and tooth necklace.

This kit would be ideal for a school/museum/heritage centre as a handling exhibit, for prehistoric re-enactment, as part a private collection

 Mesolithic toolkit (replica)

£80.00

(excludes P&P)

 

Nine items including flint tranchet knife, flint blades, scrappers and microlith. Bone harpoon and bone needle, plus sinew thread. Periwinkle (Littorina littorea) shell necklace - as found in Mesolithic sites such as Oronsay.

This kit would be ideal for a school/museum/heritage centre as a handling exhibit, for prehistoric re-enactment, as part a private collection

 Neolithic toolkit (replica)

£80.00

(excludes P&P)

 

Eight items including flint tranchet knife, flint blades, scrappers, microlith and chalk bowel

This kit would be ideal for a school/museum/heritage centre as a handling exhibit, for prehistoric re-enactment, as part a private collection

Star Carr Mesolithic deer skull headdress (replica)

 

£60.00

(excludes P&P)

One of the famous mystery objects from British prehistory, 21 of these deer skull caps with partial antlers and two holes were found on a site called Star Carr (Yorkshire). The site has been interpreted as a seasonally camp at the edge of a lake on an artificial platform.

Over 200 barbed antler points were found along with the “headdresses”. These have been theorised to be hunting disguises or ritual attire.

Very unique in Mesolithic archaeology, and very recognisable!

Upper Palaeolithic Bullroarer (replica)

£50.00

(excludes P&P)

Bullroarers are swung around the head in a circle to create a loud, low buzzing noise. This noise can be heard from a great distant, perfect for finding out if there are any other people out there in the landscape.

This example is based on a bullroarer from La Rouche (Dordogne), carved from a horse radius bone, decorated with carving then covered with a smidge of red ochre.

See it in action on the Ice Age Island of Jersey >>

Early Bronze Age Fenestrated Vessel (replica)

£30.00

(excludes P&P)

 

Several of these unusual vessels have been found in early Bronze Age burials. This particular example from Normanton Down (Wiltshire) is an exceptional example. Several theories have surrounded its potential use from lighting, insense burning to metal working.

What is clear is that a small flame (such as a tea light) inside the vessel will cause beams of light to radiate from the gaps. This creates a light effect like a sun, truly brilliant even in the modern world!

Commissions considered/accepted ~ Please email (james.dilley@btinternet.com) for further details


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